NEWSROOM

‘A sobering milestone’: 1 million South Sudanese refugees cross into Uganda


One million refugees have now been registered to have fled South Sudan into Uganda.

According to the UN Refugee Agency, over the past 12 months, an average of 1,800 South Sudanes have arrived in Uganda each day.

Philippe Guiton, humanitarian and operations director for CARE International

“One million South Sudanese refugees is a tragic and utterly sad record. The small country of Uganda is shouldering the largest refugee crisis in Africa, keeping the borders open for those fleeing brutal violence and hunger in South Sudan.

“Refugees arriving in Uganda are in dire conditions, many have walked for days through the bush with little food and water. Women and girls have been abused, beaten and raped on their journey. We call on all parties to the South Sudan conflict to stop the violence against civilians and we urge international donors to step up their commitments and help Uganda with much needed financial support. This refugee crisis is one of the most under-funded in the world and the tragedies of one million refugees in Uganda are largely ignored by world leaders.”

Fred McCray, country director for CARE South Sudan

“Today, we recognize a sobering milestone, the millionth refugee crossed from South Sudan into Uganda. We must take today to reflect, and recommit to serving the most vulnerable as they flee extreme violence and hunger – 86% of those arriving in Uganda are women and children, many have survived sexual violence during the conflict in South Sudan, and many others report experiencing sexual violence along their route, and during displacement in Uganda.

We must commend Uganda for continuing to keep their borders open, allowing South Sudanese to find safety where they can reach life-saving humanitarian assistance, and generously granting access to land so that refugee communities can move towards self-sufficiency. Uganda cannot continue to host this population without greater support and assistance from the international community.

Only a diplomatic settlement to the conflict in South Sudan can stem the deterioration of the humanitarian, economic, and security situation in the region. We call on all parties to the South Sudan conflict to stop the violence against civilians and we urge international donors to step up their commitments and support the Uganda refugee response.”

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To arrange an interview, contact:

Darcy Knoll
Communications Specialist | CARE Canada
darcy.knoll@care.ca | 613-228-5641


Millions of people are at risk in Somalia, Nigeria, South Sudan and Yemen and tens of thousands more are affected in Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda. Donate now to support CARE’s emergency efforts: care.ca/stopfamine