Cyclone Idai one year later

In March 2019, cyclone Idai slammed into Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe with speeds of more than 200 kilometers per hour, causing severe damage. One month after Idai, a second storm hit northern Mozambique while the country was still recovering. Hundreds of thousands of people have been displaced, crops have been destroyed and livelihoods lost as a result of these storms.

An estimated 750,000 people still require immediate assistance. The impact of the cyclones goes well beyond food insecurity, negatively affecting nutrition, health, education, water and sanitation.

CARE has assisted more than 300,000 people affected by the crisis with food assistance, access to water and education, shelter and drought-resistant seeds.

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Hospital in Buzi
Background: In Buzi, CARE is rebuilding the only hospital in the whole state that suffered severely from Cyclone Idai. A focus area is rebuilding the maternal waiting center where particularly women with complicated births are referred to and wait until giving birth, as most have to travel several days to reach the hospital. About 100 births take place every month..CARE’s cyclone response:
Background: In March 2019, cyclone Idai slammed into Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe with speeds of more than 200 kilometers per hour, causing severe damage. One month after Idai, a second storm hit northern Mozambique while the country was still recovering from cyclone Idai. More than 600 people died and 1,600 were injured during the unprecedented disasters of Cyclones Idai and Kenneth. Furthermore, hundreds of thousands of people have been displaced, crops have been destroyed and livelihoods lost as a result of these storms.
It is the first time in recorded history that two strong tropical cyclones have hit the country during the same season. An estimated 750,000 people still require immediate assistance. The impact of the cyclones goes well beyond food insecurity, negatively affecting nutrition, health, education, water and sanitation.
Cyclone Idai destroyed more than 700,000 hectares of crops including maize, ground nut, cassava, beans and rice. All of the fields have been indurated. Experts estimate that the agricultural loss in Mozambique is at least USD 141 million high. More than 73,000 people are living in temporary shelters, most of them are schools and community buildings. Over 3,000 classrooms have been destroyed, over 330,000 students have been affected.
What CARE is doing: CARE has assisted more than 300.000 people affected by the crisis with food assistance, access to water and education, shelter and drought-resistant seeds. This also includes the provision of hygiene items including emergency household items such as tarpaulins, blankets
.Flora Jossias (26), mother of twins, with grandmother Rosa Castigo
I gave birth to my twins in the hospital here in Buzi. I am from Bandua, which is about 2 hours away by car, but was transferred here because the health center did not have the medical means to carry out the delivery. I was only eight months pregnant when we moved here, it was a premature delivery. I have two more children, they are three years and six years old. Me and my mother, who came along, waited for two weeks for the birth of my twins. We lived in a plastic tent outside the hospital, which is currently being restored after the cyclone. It is very hot here and it has been quite challenging. Right now is the rainy season and our biggest challenges back home are finding food and rebuilding our own house. We still have a field where we grow food and I sell coal to make a living. My only hope now is to see my children grow healthy and make enough money to support my family.Hospital in Buzi
Background: In Buzi, CARE is rebuilding the only hospital in the whole state that suffered severely from Cyclone Idai. A focus area is rebuilding the maternal waiting center where particularly women with complicated births are referred to and wait until giving birth, as most have to travel several days to reach the hospital. About 100 births take place every month..CARE’s cyclone response:
Background: In March 2019, cyclone Idai slammed into Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe with speeds of more than 200 kilometers per hour, causing severe damage. One month after Idai, a second storm hit northern Mozambique while the country was still recovering from cyclone Idai. More than 600 people died and 1,600 were injured during the unprecedented disasters of Cyclones Idai and Kenneth. Furthermore, hundreds of thousands of people have been displaced, crops have been destroyed and livelihoods lost as a result of these storms.
It is the first time in recorded history that two strong tropical cyclones have hit the

Safe spaces to give birth

In Buzi, Mozambique CARE is rebuilding the only hospital in the whole state that was affected by cyclone Idai. We're focusing on rebuilding the maternal waiting center where women with complicated births are referred to and wait until giving birth, as most have to travel several days to reach the hospital. About 100 births take place here every month.

Flora Jossias pictured here with her twins and grandmother Rosa. "It is very hot here and it has been quite challenging. Our biggest challenges back home are finding food and rebuilding our own house. We still have a field where we grow food and I sell coal to make a living. My only hope now is to see my children grow healthy and make enough money to support my family.

CARE distributed drought-resistant seeds and providing basic training in improved agricultural practices to help communities combat the effects of climate change going forward

Helping farmers

Mozambique is extremely vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and extreme weather events like droughts, floods and cyclones. This has a huge impact on how people earn a living and their access to food, particularly for women and children. According to the Government of Mozambique, 1.6 million people currently do not have enough food to eat and are in need of food aid. This number is likely to rise to 1.9 million in the coming months.

As part of its response to the weather extremes here in Mozambique, CARE is distributing drought-resistant seeds, which include sorghum, cowpea, ground nuts, pineapple seedlings, maize and millet, to more than 47,000 small scale farmers. CARE is also providing training to help improve farming practices to help communities be better prepared for future shocks.

Luisa Marcos Joan (16) receives a hygiene kit in Mozambique

Hygiene kits

CARE has provided hygiene kits with emergency household items such as tarpaulins, blankets, mosquito nets, sleeping mats, bathing soap, and jerry to thousands of people who are still lacking the basics.

Hygiene Promotion at Nharuchonga Primary School in Nhamatanda: Background: CARE’s WASH programming activities include providing hygiene kits and appropriate latrine facilities for almost 57,655 women and girls. The kits include soaps, sanitary pads, water buckets and other items. CARE is also rehabilitating latrines at schools

Preparing for the future

Whether its in construction or rehabilitation of new buildings or water sources, CARE is helping people rebuild.

CARE is repairing severely damaged classrooms with resilient materials, ensuring they are better able to withstand future events.